Scottish Pharmacy Awards 2019

Setting the Scene

Having firmly embedded itself in the fabric of Scotland’s tradition, we have been counting the days until our annual opportunity to express gratitude to the sterling members of our pharmacy service. And that time is finally upon us – with the 2019 Scottish Pharmacy Awards.

The 2019 Scottish Pharmacy Awards ceremony is driving the heart of the sector together on 6th November; taking place at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Glasgow, and navigated by esteemed host, Shereen Nanjiani.

The evening – punctuated by a delightful dinner and networking opportunities – will bestow honour on those who not only demonstrate excellent character, but who have cultivated much-needed change in the industry during the last 12 months and beyond.

The finalists in each of the 10 categories have been selected following a hard-fought application process, and the winners will be revealed on the night; culminating with the announcement of this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award recipient.

The evening’s nominated charity is the Scottish Association for Mental Health (SAMH). Around since 1923, SAMH is Scotland’s national mental health charity which works in over 60 communities with adults and young people, providing mental health social care support, and services in primary care, schools and further education, among others. These services – together with the national programme work in See Me, respectme, suicide prevention and active living – inform SAMH’s policy and campaign work to influence positive social change.

Sponsored by – Scothealthcare.com

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Sponsored by – The Pharmacists’ Defence Association

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Sponsored by – Ethypharm UK

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Sponsored by – Napp Pharmaceuticals Limited

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Sponsored by – Kent Pharmaceuticals

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Sponsored by – Teva UK Respiratory

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Sponsored by – Cambrian Alliance Group

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Good luck to all of our finalists! Learn about their stories – and underlying motivation

Delivery of Pharmaceutical Care

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NHS Ayrshire & Arran

The Care at Home Pharmacy Technician Service NHS Ayrshire & Arran

The Care at Home Pharmacy Technician Service
NHS Ayrshire & Arran

The Care at Home Pharmacy (CAP) Technician Service in East and South Ayrshire represents an excellent demonstration of partnership working to deliver the highest level of safe, patient-centred care.

The pharmacy technician works with elderly and / or vulnerable residents within the Health & Social Care Partnership area who have been identified by a health or social care professional as requiring help with a medication-related problem. This is particularly pertinent to those patients recently discharged from hospital, but also regards those living at home and experiencing difficulty with their medicines. The CAP technician visits patients in their own homes to review concordance and compliance with medicines, with onward referral to other services where required.

NHS Ayrshire & Arran

The Community Pharmacy Pharmacotherapy Service NHS Ayrshire & Arran

The Community Pharmacy Pharmacotherapy Service
NHS Ayrshire & Arran

The initiative established an opportunity for a collaborative approach to improve patient care and outcomes, as well as prescribing efficiencies, in line with the current direction of travel of healthcare in Scotland.

From the outset the ambition was to assess the possibility of transferring specific elements of the pharmacotherapy service to community pharmacy, with a view to – among other objectives – redesign the pharmacy work flow to enable GPCPs and CPs to spend more time with their patients, and increase the clinical role of community pharmacists by identifying pharmacotherapy activities that could be delivered in their pharmacy.

      Four elements of the pharmacotherapy service were subsequently identified as appropriate for a community pharmacist to manage in their pharmacy: prescription requests; medication queries; medication reviews (high-risk medicines, polypharmacy); and clinical treatment reviews (asthma).

Health Centre Pharmacy, HMP Perth

David Morrison and Team Health Centre Pharmacy, HMP Perth

David Morrison and Team
Health Centre Pharmacy, HMP Perth

Following both the reclassification of gabapentanoids to schedule 3 controlled drugs and the increasing number of drug-related deaths in Scotland – and specifically Tayside – a novel way to undertake polypharmacy reviews specifically aimed at these medications was designed.

Showcasing the team’s innovative spirit, patients thus began to attend for review either with David, as an independent prescribing pharmacist, or a GP. The in-depth dialogue centred on the drug-related death figures, in which the patient’s views were sought. This allowed for a very open and honest channel of communication to be opened between the clinician and the patient.

Patients who were initially resistant to the reviews were now more willing to actively participate; equipped with the relevant knowledge and information required to help bolster their safety.

Holburn Pharmacy, Aberdeen

Sinead Collins and Team Holburn Pharmacy, Aberdeen

Sinead Collins and Team
Holburn Pharmacy, Aberdeen

Striving to wield the highest quality assistance for the public, the pharmacy offers several services for patients with substance misuse issues. These include the provision of consume-on-the-premises methadone / subutex / suboxone, needle exchange facilities, naloxone provision and training, safer injection technique counselling, and confidential advice on blood-borne diseases.

The team attended a substance misuse seminar earlier this year; sparking the ability to highlight patients who were at risk of overdose due to polydrug use; those who were becoming more erratic in their drug use and behaviour; and those who were injecting in an unsafe manner who would benefit from advice and counselling.

LloydsPharmacy, Tannahill Centre, Paisley

Rebecca Allan and Team LloydsPharmacy, Tannahill Centre, Paisley

Rebecca Allan and Team
LloydsPharmacy, Tannahill Centre, Paisley

Over the past year Rebecca has been involved in running a pilot drop-in diabetes clinic within LloydsPharmacy in Ferguslie Park in Paisley, for patients who have a type 2 diabetes diagnosis.

The drop-in clinic aims to review patients’ medication management, as well as facilitate education on their condition and how they can actively manage this through nutrition and exercise.    

      Patients can attend just once or on multiple occasions to obtain the information and guidance in question, following which they can be signposted to a multitude of other services within the area that can help them effectively self-care. Examples of this incorporate podiatry services and weekly nutrition and cooking classes.

Student Leadership

Sponsored by The Pharmacists’ Defence Association

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Robert Gordon University

Conor Thorne Robert Gordon University

Conor Thorne
Robert Gordon University

Displaying the industriousness and compassion to not only seek ways to address his own gaps in knowledge, but to help his peers too, Conor liaised with his lecturer and fellow students to set up a study group. As a result of his efforts, each Wednesday during the semester, students who needed extra support would meet and discuss a topic which they deemed difficult.

Eager to continue paving a positive path for students, Conor entered the MPharm student elections and was successfully selected as an academic representative on the Robert Gordon University (RGU) Pharmacy Committee – a position which he held for two sessions after being re-elected. Conor is also currently in his second year as the publications officer for the RGU Pharmacy Law and Ethics Group; creating the group’s newsletter every semester.

Robert Gordon University

Erin Gilmour Robert Gordon University

Erin Gilmour
Robert Gordon University

As president of the student-led Aberdeen Interprofessional Education Society, Erin is heavily involved in chairing the organisation, as well as promoting its offerings to students, and organising learning events, social activities and committee meetings throughout the year.

Since taking up the position, Erin has been armed with the resolve to grow the society, achieve broader representation, and attain greater support from lecturers.

Pursuing platforms for greater engagement, Erin updated all of the society’s social media outlets and agreed a standard format with the committee as to how information would appear on their website, Twitter and Facebook pages. The interest subsequently expressed has been notable as at the end of the year the society finished with their highest number of members ever at 256; being the largest society at RGU.

Robert Gordon University

Kelsey Drummond Robert Gordon University

Kelsey Drummond
Robert Gordon University

Kelsey’s leadership skills have flourished as a result of her role as Northern area co-ordinator of the British Pharmaceutical Students Association (BPSA) – a post which entails her working with a team of 17 other executive members, and co-ordinating a group of representatives from Robert Gordon, Strathclyde, Sunderland and Newcastle Universities.

Kelsey is currently organising a conference at Newcastle University on the topic of ‘Vulnerable Groups’, which aims to support pharmacy students throughout their studies and add a greater depth to their knowledge.

Keen to represent the views of the student members and make their voices heard, Kelsey attended the Scottish Pharmacy Board in July and has been engaging with the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Scotland to identify ways in which to implement the desired changes.

University of Strathclyde

Sagarika Ojha University of Strathclyde

Sagarika Ojha
University of Strathclyde

Throughout her time at university Sagarika has effectively utilised the information available to make evidence-based decisions while interacting with her fellow classmates in order to present her vision of the future of pharmacy. A key example of this was during her BPSA representatives training which provided a platform for the attendees to learn how to further improve themselves as BPSA representatives, and to conduct discussions centred on real-world data and evidence from past BPSA and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society records.

Sagarika has additionally participated in long-term mentoring in the form of the Outward-Bound Leadership Course; enthusiastically fulfilling a series of difficult academic and physical activities.

Robert Gordon University

Vivien Yu Robert Gordon University

Vivien Yu
Robert Gordon University

As Vivien has developed throughout her course, she has been introduced to the limitless opportunities that having a Pharmacy degree can offer, and motivated to showcase these prospects to her fellow peers at every chance available. By involving and immersing herself in various societies, she has been impactful in enhancing the morale of other students by sharing and encouraging their involvement too.

Through her role as the preliminary BPSA representative this year, Vivien has helped to inspire others to also apply by detailing her own responsibilities and contributions, answering any questions, and simultaneously easing their concerns and boosting their confidence. This ultimately benefitted the BPSA and the Northern area co-ordinator as they ended up over-subscribed with applications.

Innovative Use of Technology in Community Pharmacy

Sponsored by Cegedim Rx

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Cadham Pharmacy Health Centre, Glenrothes

Bernadette Colford and Team Cadham Pharmacy Health Centre, Glenrothes

Bernadette Colford and Team
Cadham Pharmacy Health Centre, Glenrothes

Technology is at the heart of the sector, and despite the challenges which this might present, Bernadette and the team have been persistent and enthusiastic in their approach to embracing the new era of digital pharmacy.

Testament to the pharmacy’s success has been the staff who have worked hard to learn new machines, support the introduction of huge screens, develop private travel and aesthetics services, and implement innovative NHS offerings that meant going back to university for the pharmacists.

The pharmacy introduced a fundamental piece of technology earlier this year with the aim of enhancing accessibility for patients – an NHS-approved app, HEALTHERA. Launched in August after a three-month training and planning phase, the initiative aligns with Bernadette’s dream for the pharmacy to truly become digital and meet the changing expectations of consumers.

The pharmacy’s first robot was installed four years ago and provided an outstanding example to Bernadette as to how technology could help her to protect, nurture and grow the family business. The team introduced the pill pouch-maker, and evidenced the benefit which this brought to the community at the NHS hearing. Currently, the team are working towards improving their social media employment and creating a better website, as well as setting up an online shop, and offering a 24 / 7 click and collect service.

Dickies Pharmacy, Summerhill, Aberdeen

Bethany Potter and Team Dickies Pharmacy, Summerhill, Aberdeen

Bethany Potter and Team
Dickies Pharmacy, Summerhill, Aberdeen

Due to the ageing population and an increase in co-morbidities etc., home delivery of medication has emerged as a service which is increasingly requested. Seeking to provide the highest quality of care for patients and fulfill their needs, all of the branches now offer a free home delivery service, and the team have trialed numerous ways to manage this service in an efficient and safe manner.

As a result of the high number of home delivery patients, and with new GDPR laws coming in stating that consent is now required for delivery, an opportunity was identified for seeking exciting new ways of managing their deliveries. This resulted in the implementation of Pro Delivery Manager, which after being trialed in one branch – and reaping tremendous results – has been rolled out across the other sites too.

The positive impact which the technology has had on the different corners of the business has been far-reaching. For example, deliveries are now more efficient; reducing paper records and making a clearer audit trail of deliveries; and the workload of staff has significantly decreased, as adding in deliveries to the system is easy and saves large amounts of time. The safety of the process has vastly improved, too, in that consent is clearly stated on each patient’s record – lessening incidents of data breaches.

Right Medicine Pharmacy Group

Noel Wicks and Team Right Medicine Pharmacy Group

Noel Wicks and Team
Right Medicine Pharmacy Group

The introduction of the team’s project is indicative of their determination to not only advance patient safety and support families caring for loved ones, but to also ensure the appropriate deployment of NHS and council resources, all the while keeping people healthier and independent in their homes for longer.

The new form of technology introduced is an electronic MDS solution that prompts patients to take medicines and incorporates GSM technology in order to give SMS alert messages in the event of any forms of non-compliance, as well as monitor and record medicines adherence. The system is called the YOURmeds Alert Medpack and the group are Scotland’s first and only provider.

The main objective of this innovation was to encourage the use of device technology to support an existing delivery of care package around medicines management for people within an independent living setting. This included improving medicines adherence, safety, and maintaining independence for service-users through a tailored and person-specific approach. A further aim focused on producing a more streamlined service for both the team members of the service provider, the service-user, and the pharmacy staff.

Hospital Pharmacy Team of the Year

Sponsored by Ethypharm UK

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NHS Highland

The New Craigs Pharmacy Team NHS Highland

The New Craigs Pharmacy Team
NHS Highland

The specialist mental health pharmacy team are based within the in-patient service, but as the number of hospital beds has gradually reduced over the years, their workload has evolved from being entirely in-patient-focussed to also providing clinical pharmacy input to out-patient care on an ad-hoc basis.

As an increasingly valuable asset to the sector, the team assure that quality patient-centred pharmaceutical care is delivered to patients with mental health conditions through safe, evidence-based and cost-effective use of medicines. Demonstrative of this, the team implemented a 12-month pilot in two general practices in remote and rural Scotland, with patients with a diagnosis of depression and / or anxiety referred by general practitioners to specialist mental health pharmacist independent prescribers from their team for review and any necessary follow-up to ensure the safe and effective use of medication.

The project’s results provided evidence that specialist mental health pharmacist independent prescribers delivered quality care to patients with diagnoses of moderate-to-severe depression and / or anxiety.

NHS Ayrshire & Arran

The Care at Home Pharmacy Technician Service NHS Ayrshire & Arran

The Care at Home Pharmacy Technician Service
NHS Ayrshire & Arran

The Care at Home Pharmacy (CAP) Technician Service in East and South Ayrshire has propelled partnership working into the spotlight; indicating how it can deliver the best level of care across transitions.

The service initially focussed on elderly people discharged from hospital with a care package, but now receives referrals from the multidisciplinary team involved in adult care: social work, care managers, homecare managers, district nurses, occupational therapists, enablement teams, and third sector organisations.

The CAP technicians receive a list of all patients discharged from hospital which they review, and then contact the patient or carer to assess the need for pharmaceutical input. Having access to both health and social care IT systems, the team can determine what level of care is currently provided to the patient and ascertain whether this may need changed.

NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

The Rheumatology Pharmacy Team NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

The Rheumatology Pharmacy Team
NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Equipped with a core understanding of the rheumatic disease states, along with the complexities of drug therapies and adverse effects, the team are ideally placed to contribute effectively to patient management and wellbeing.

The team are comprised of three specialist pharmacists, each based in the three different sectors within NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde, who meet on a regular basis to discuss relevant issues, tackle service problems, and plan audit work / projects. Each individual derives from an extensive background in the hospital sector and, specifically, clinical pharmacy. Completing post-graduate training and qualifications, including the clinical diploma, MSc in Clinical Pharmacy, and most recently, independent prescribing, has enabled them to deliver services at the top of their license.

In their advanced practitioner roles, the team run pharmacist-led rheumatology clinics with the overall aim to provide optimum pharmaceutical care to patients. Objectives included switching to biosimilars, biologic dose tapering, and reducing consultant waiting times.

NHS Lothian

The Lauriston and Chalmers Pharmacy Team NHS Lothian

The Lauriston and Chalmers Pharmacy Team
NHS Lothian

The specialist pharmacy outpatient team have stood out for their consistent high-quality delivery of clinical pharmacy and dispensing services to patients across two specialities – namely HIV and dermatology – in a city centre location at Chalmers Centre and Lauriston Building.

The team support four dermatology and four HIV clinical sessions per week; up to 35 patients may require dispensing +/- clinical pharmacist input (e.g. patient counselling or medication review) during each session. They also work closely with the other HIV multidisciplinary team based at the Regional Infectious Diseases Unit at WGH and remotely support the dermatology service based at St John’s, Roodlands and WGH.

The team’s day-to-day contribution to NHS Lothian is exemplary, as the pharmacists teach patients how to inject biologic and cytotoxic medicines and work in partnership with these patient groups to achieve concordance with therapies where non-compliance could have potentially drastic consequences.

Innovations in Clinical Development in Cardiology Pharmacy

Sponsored by Daiichi-Sankyo

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Gilbert Bain Hospital, NHS Shetland

Anthony McDavitt and Team Gilbert Bain Hospital, NHS Shetland

Anthony McDavitt and Team
Gilbert Bain Hospital, NHS Shetland

Within an island-based Rural General Hospital a small team of pre-operative assessment nursing staff work with patients and the wider multidisciplinary team to safely take patients through their procedure. The team pre-assess a wide variety of procedures and interventions delivered by a broad range of consultant general and specialist surgical staff, with a strongly heterogenous case mix.

Oral anticoagulants (OAC) and the planning required are a complex clinical area for the team to manage effectively. The POA nurses have to ensure that the patient has the right plan for them based on their risk of bleeding and VTE.

This initiative utilised significant event analysis to review previous issues OACs presented POAC staff with. The interdisciplinary team were brought together to review the current process’ weaknesses, and develop a new approach to reduce variation, support staff, foster responsibility in teams, and provide clear information for patients and community professionals.

William Street Clinic, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Clodagh Clarke William Street Clinic, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Clodagh Clarke
William Street Clinic, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

The primary aim of the service development was to measure self-reported cardiology training needs of general practice clinical pharmacists (GPCPs) and provide information to support the design of cardiology-specific elements of a local education and training programme to support the evolving role.

Initially, the project evaluated the cardiology learning needs of GPCPs and results were then used to develop a programme of learning to support unmet training needs. Face-to-face training sessions were delivered and electronic resources have been produced, containing information about less well-understood cardiology medication. Existing supporting materials, references, guidelines, and links to external training courses have also been collated and incorporated into staff training to address unmet learning needs around cardiac conditions and clinical skills examination.

Crail Medical Practice, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Rachel Bruce Crail Medical Practice, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Rachel Bruce
Crail Medical Practice, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

The roots of the project were forged following the practice’s awareness that their patient journey for management of hypertension was sub-optimal, with patients being passed between the healthcare assistant, practice nurse, and a variety of GPs for hypertension management – particularly for those newly-diagnosed, and those with uncontrolled hypertension. To secure a more seamless care pathway, it was identified by the pharmacist and the practice staff that setting up a pharmacist-led hypertension clinic would streamline the patient journey, improve continuity of care, and result in better patient care and clinical outcomes.

The weekly pharmacist hypertension clinic was subsequently established; providing nine or 10 appointments per week.

Crieff Blue Medical Practice, NHS Tayside

Kenneth Halliday Crieff Blue Medical Practice, NHS Tayside

Kenneth Halliday
Crieff Blue Medical Practice, NHS Tayside

The driver for the heart failure clinic arose from a collaborative approach with the practice GP lead for cardiovascular patients in which it was identified that patients with a diagnosis of heart failure weren’t being treated as per evidence-based guidelines. Additional inspiration stemmed from Kenneth’s long-time interest in cardiovascular treatment as a result of a previous pharmacy post at the London Chest Hospital, and the completion of a diploma in Chronic Heart Failure at Glasgow Caledonian Univeristy.

The cohort of patients chosen were patients with heart failure associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction due to the fact that an audit of medical treatment revealed that this group of patients weren’t being managed optimally, and that improvements could be made in their medical therapeutic treatment.

Pharmacy Department, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian

Cardiology Pharmacy, Lynne DavidsonSparked by her attendance at a national heart failure conference, Lynne became aware of the ‘teach and treat’ programme and contacted the project lead, Paul Forsyth, for further details – keen to establish a local service in Grampian.

The post-MI LVSD patient cohort was chosen, as this was already an evidence-based intervention which had been successfully attempted in other areas of Scotland. This was also a group who currently don’t have any defined local follow-up contact with secondary care / specialist services.

Patients were invited to attend the pharmacist clinic, which was stand-alone, where they would undergo medication review, including review of haematology and biochemistry results, clinical examination, and recent symptom history taking as part of the consultation.

Innovations in Prescribing, Quality and Efficiency in Scotland

Sponsored by Napp Pharmaceuticals Limited

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NHS Dumfries & Galloway

Amy Robinson and the Wigtownshire Prescribing Support Team NHS Dumfries & Galloway

Amy Robinson and the Wigtownshire Prescribing Support Team
NHS Dumfries & Galloway

The roll-out of the pharmacotherapy service presented the team with an opportunity to seek new ways of delivering extended services.

In particular, a pharmacy hub emerged as a beneficial platform; enabling the team’s offerings to derive from a central point using their varied skillmix, as well as providing peer support and training; cutting down travelling; and maximising the number of hours spent on supplying their specialist services.

The initiative has paved the way for a multitude of advantages; notably, facilitating the chance for a GPCP pharmacist, a trained and a trainee technician, and two prescribing support officers to work together in one room, to flow work across the team, and to provide peer support in a supervised training environment.

NHS Ayrshire & Arran

The Community Pharmacy Pharmacotherapy Service Team NHS Ayrshire & Arran

The Community Pharmacy Pharmacotherapy Service Team
NHS Ayrshire & Arran

General practices clinical pharmacists have been experiencing an increasing workload –confronted with traditional prescribing efficiency work, coupled with the demand of the pharmacotherapy service, part of the new General Medical Services Contract. This project thus centred on a test of change to evaluate whether specific elements of the pharmacotherapy service can be delivered through community pharmacy.

Positive outcomes were achieved, in which the clinical role of the community pharmacist was optimised, and overall patient care was enhanced. Additionally, there was an increased awareness within this patient group of the role of the community pharmacist in medicines management and supporting patients to manage stable long-term conditions.

NHS Grampian

The Health and Social Care Moray Pharmacy Team NHS Grampian

The Health and Social Care Moray Pharmacy Team
NHS Grampian

The new GP contract prompted the team to seize an initiative in making improvements in GP practice pharmacy in the areas of safe, efficient, cost-effective and appropriate prescribing. Together with the primary care improvement plan and integrating with the Grampian Primary Care Group, they recruited and developed a pharmacotherapy team alongside the existing practice pharmacist and technician input.

In accordance with their collaborative approach, existing SOPs were shared and guidelines were developed in order to promote consistency in working practice across Moray.

Further boosting the project’s morale, new pharmacists and pharmacy technicians were employed, and regular meetings were conducted with the aim of encouraging colleagues to voice their ideas.

Borders General Hospital, NHS Borders

Keith Maclure and Kirsty Lamb Borders General Hospital, NHS Borders

Keith Maclure and Kirsty Lamb
Borders General Hospital, NHS Borders

The aim of the initiative was to create a prescribing policy that could be used by all practices in NHS Borders to ensure a unified model of working between different practices. The policy specifies the procedures associated with all prescribing tasks and is designed to aid members of the prescribing support team in working within a variety of practices.

An initial step was to obtain the prescribing policies from the NHS Borders GP practices and extract the most common / appropriate aspects from the individual policies to create a Unified Prescribing Policy. It was subsequently sent to stakeholders for review and feedback, in addition to other members of the team, before being taken to the local Pharmacotherapy Oversight Group and Practice Managers Meeting.

NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

The East Renfrewshire Medication Support Service Team NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

The East Renfrewshire Medication Support Service Team
NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

The Medication Support Service in East Renfrewshire is a pharmacy technician-led service which provides comprehensive medicines support for adult patient residents in the community. This includes medicines reconciliation for patients who have recently come out of hospital, or who have been referred to the service. Referrals may be made by any member of the health and social care team, or patients may self-refer.

The team play a key role in cultivating excellent patient care by providing expert medication advice to not only the individual, but their family / carers too, supporting them to manage their medicines independently at home.

The service is fully integrated within the HSCP and the technicians work closely with others involved with individual patients, including GPs and community nurses.

Management of Substance Misuse in the Community

Sponsored by Ethypharm UK

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The Community Prescribing Team, NHS Lanarkshire

Clair Smith The Community Prescribing Team, NHS Lanarkshire

Clair Smith
The Community Prescribing Team, NHS Lanarkshire

Working as a locum sessional pharmacist within the CPS in Lanarkshire, Clair assists patients in a variety of settings, such as community pharmacy, a social work building, and several primary and secondary care locations.

With a caseload comprising over 70 patients, Clair is unfaltering in her commitment to their pharmaceutical care, and in particular, her provision of support and prescriptions relating to their substance misuse. As such, her expertise includes opiate substitution therapy, overdose awareness training, naloxone provision, BBV testing and motivational interventions. Clair also refers to other NHS services and signposts to third sector agencies.

As part of Clair’s CPS role, she has recently undertaken a new clinic within two GP practices.

Dickies Pharmacy, Summerhill, Aberdeen

Bethany Potter Dickies Pharmacy, Summerhill, Aberdeen

Bethany Potter
Dickies Pharmacy, Summerhill, Aberdeen

Around 80 patients on opiate substitution therapy attend the pharmacy either daily or numerous times a week, and throughout the last few years the team have worked incredibly hard to get to know these patients so that they can create a safe and non-judgmental environment to help support them through their recovery. This has resulted in excellent relationships being forged between the patients and the staff and pharmacist, which has thus led to the further development of services. The strides undertaken by the pharmacy for the benefit of the community include naloxone supply and training and hepatitis C testing and treating.

Demonstrative of their multidisciplinary nature, too, the team work successfully with the local substance misuse clinic and CPN.

NHS Lanarkshire

Elizabeth Marr and Clair Smith NHS Lanarkshire

Elizabeth Marr and Clair Smith
NHS Lanarkshire

Working with two GP practices, the team’s objective has been to identify patients who are either on above recommended doses of opiate painkillers or over-using their prescribed opiates, following which assistance would be supplied by reducing their dose to the minimum required. Additionally, for people whose original illness has recovered, the painkiller was to be discontinued altogether.

A variety of methods have been adopted in order to develop the programme among the staff, such as conducting meetings to brainstorm; reading other trials around the same patient group; and holding a training day for prescribing support pharmacists.

The impact of their work on the wider healthcare team has been exceptional, and the surgeries involved have now been able to implement good prescribing practice for opiates.

Rowlands Pharmacy, Springburn Way, Glasgow

Mark Grehan Rowlands Pharmacy, Springburn Way, Glasgow

Mark Grehan
Rowlands Pharmacy, Springburn Way, Glasgow

Since moving to Rowlands in 2016, Mark and the team have developed one of the most wide-ranging substance misuse support service programmes in Greater Glasgow & Clyde. They service roughly 90 ORT patients through their methameasure dispensing tool, and provide clean injecting equipment, in addition to the appropriate advice to substance misuse patients.

Two especially impactful local initiatives which Mark has championed within the pharmacy since completing his training in 2017 have been the take-home naloxone service (providing take-home naloxone kits and training in the pharmacy setting) and the blood-borne virus testing service (finger prick test in the pharmacy testing for active hepatitis C and HIV infection).

Rowlands Pharmacy, Coatbridge

Seonaid Campbell Rowlands Pharmacy, Coatbridge

Seonaid Campbell
Rowlands Pharmacy, Coatbridge

Seonaid’s enthusiasm for this field has translated to her work as an independent prescriber within the Lanarkshire Addiction and Recovery Team, in which she has garnered a unique insight into the pharmaceutical care of this vulnerable group.

As a result of being in a key position to offer an enhanced level of service to these patients, Seonaid has led her team to adopt a holistic approach to substance misuse patients – looking at patients as individuals, rather than as a collective. She also deems it crucial to remain up-to-date with regulations, guidelines and training, and to host regular team meetings where new issues are discussed.

Consistent contact with the substance misuse team in the hospital is additionally maintained if Seonaid is aware that one of her patients has been admitted to ensure that there’s no gap in treatment.

Community Pharmacy Practice of the Year

Sponsored by Kent Pharmaceuticals

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Cadham Pharmacy Health Centre, Glenrothes

Bernadette Colford and Team Cadham Pharmacy Health Centre, Glenrothes

Bernadette Colford and Team
Cadham Pharmacy Health Centre, Glenrothes

Underscored by a commitment to encompassing as many elements of high-quality patient care as possible, the pharmacy’s array of services continue to go from strength-to-strength. The team’s openness to innovation has particularly contributed to their success, in which Bernadette was approached by a pharmacist who thought that she might be interested in a 24 / 7 collection robot. The pharmacy now has two machines installed due to its soaring popularity across the community and the merits which it brings, not just for patients, but for the staff too, by way of adding functionality and saving time collecting repeat packages already assembled and ready to collect.

The introduction of an asthma clinic is in line with Bernadette and the team’s aim to see whether a pharmacist utilising all of their expert knowledge of medicines – combined with motivational consultation skills and assessment skills – could support people to change their approach to their asthma management. In the path to its implementation, the workforce were up-skilled to deliver care at the top of their skillset, while it was determined that included in every consultation would be a detailed history and assessment, and an independent pharmacist pracitioner would treat in acute and long-term disease management.

Ogg and Company Pharmacy, Ayr

Jane Rorison and Team Ogg and Company Pharmacy, Ayr

Jane Rorison and Team
Ogg and Company Pharmacy, Ayr

Established in 1836, the pharmacy is one of the oldest businesses in Ayr, and was purchased by Lime Tree Healthcare six-and-a-half years ago, with Jane adopting the role of manager since the acquisition.

The pharmacy had not experienced any significant investment since the 1970s, however, in 2014, a year after acquiring it, a mammoth enhancement was carried out and the setting was entirely refitted.

One of the key priorities for change included modernising the retail sales area, yet choosing a style which was in sympathy with the heritage of the business and its location in Newmarket Street, one of the oldest streets in Ayr. The work also included doubling the size of the dispensary and propelling it further forward in the layout of the shop. This had the simultaneous effect – and benefit – of moving the location of the pharmacist and the dispensary staff closer to the front shop counter and to the patients. A modern consultation room was also added and is used on a daily basis for clinics and patient consultations.

In the last 12 months a common clinical conditions clinic has been initiated which has advanced the pharmacy’s provision of patient care by covering a variety of conditions that Jane has been trained to assess, diagnose and treat. Individuals with sore throats, chest infections, ear problems and a variety of skin issues are examples of those who present regularly to the clinic, as well as patients who can’t be treated via the Pharmacy First service.

High Street, Alloa

The Well Pharmacy Team High Street, Alloa

The Well Pharmacy Team
High Street, Alloa

A strategic review of the operational effectiveness of the entire Well Pharmacy estate is conducted annually – and with the Alloa store being identified as a priority, these plans for improvement came to fruition.

The whole project required input from a variety of stakeholders – from the branch staff to the regional and divisional management teams and the various suppliers involved with the refit itself – and the results have been impressive. The dispensary prior to the refit was an ‘old style’ one raised up from the rest of the shop floor, however this was subsequently levelled with the objective of bolstering both the access and visibility of the pharmacist to patients. Additionally, a previously large retail space was reduced to provide a greater area for the dispensary, and clever design has more than doubled the floor space in the dispensary without halving the retail area.

A small consultation room has been replaced with a more spacious and fully DDA compliant one, including a hatch where patients can access the recently-installed Methameasure system, which has freed up more time for the team, and also allowed the pharmacy to meet the ever-increasing patient safety demands.

Following the successful completion of this large refit project the working environment for the staff has significantly improved and as a result of the modern appearance of the pharmacy and happier team, the patient experience has also been massively enhanced.

Respiratory Project of the Year

Sponsored by Teva UK Respiratory

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Newcastleton Medical Practice, NHS Borders

Libby Kennedy Newcastleton Medical Practice, NHS Borders

Libby Kennedy
Newcastleton Medical Practice, NHS Borders

Serving a remote and rural population in the most Southerly health centre in NHS Borders, Newcastleton Surgery’s isolation promotes unique challenges and opportunities. For example, the current staff shortage within the respiratory service has meant that the team have been managing their respiratory patients themselves while they’re waiting for clinic appointments.

The underlying motivation of the project has been to deliver the best care possible to all patients registered at the practice who have a respiratory condition. Their approach is multi-faceted – including a comprehensive consultation and discussion at the patient’s initial presentation; prescribing according to current formulary and current guidance; counseling on optimal use of inhalers; and providing personal action plans.

Raising awareness of respiratory conditions across the wider community has proven to be vitally important to the team, leading to Libby conducting visits to the local primary school and educating teachers on MDI / Spacer use, as well as offering Asthma UK ‘school cards’ which the staff have found useful to help monitor children and quantify SABA use. She also recognises the necessity of educating carers regarding how to supervise / administer inhalers, and often carries out home visits to house-bound patients.

Maintaining open lines of communication has helped to foster the team’s success, so that information is passed quickly and accurately to the appropriate person or place.

Willis Pharmacy, Troon

Cian Lombard Willis Pharmacy, Troon

Cian Lombard
Willis Pharmacy, Troon

Willis Pharmacy is a family-run pharmacy, providing patients with support, advice and medication to optimise health and wellbeing. The open plan pharmacy is completely accessible and there is a consultation room where patients can talk privately and confidentially about any healthcare matter.

In order to achieve improved patient outcomes, the pharmacy’s initiative has included the introduction of a pharmacist clinical review of prescribed medication, in addition to the assessment of the patient’s inhaler technique. The team have also been diligent in delivering targeted information about relevant services available to patients with asthma and COPD (e.g. pulmonary rehab, smoking cessation and flu vaccination), and promoting the use of the MCN’s Asthma Action Plan (where appropriate). As pharmacy is so accessible, the team have utilised the platform to interact with patients and conduct respiratory reviews on an ad-hoc basis, increasing patient engagement.

The enthusiastic pharmacy team, a definitive model of care, appropriate resources, and staff training have been key drivers to the success of the project. Although it’s still on-going, it has already made a difference. The pharmacist has reviewed several patients, identified compliance and concordance issues, and initiated patient interventions to improve symptom control and overall disease management.

Prescribing Support Pharmacist and Lead Respiratory Pharmacist, NHS Borders

Elaine Hancock Prescribing Support Pharmacist and Lead Respiratory Pharmacist, NHS Borders

Elaine Hancock
Prescribing Support Pharmacist and Lead Respiratory Pharmacist, NHS Borders

In addition to effectively fulfilling her role as an NHS Borders pharmacist and working in three GP practices in the Scottish Borders, since 2016 Elaine has been developing her position as lead respiratory pharmacist for NHS Borders.

The respiratory project started to take shape in 2016 – an exciting year in that lessons were still being garnered from the NRAD 2014 report, and in November 2016 SIGN 153 Asthma launched, followed by GOLD COPD guidelines; both of which would change the way in which patients are managed. Having organised a respiratory study day, and identified it as a key platform to talk about the new asthma and COPD guidance, Elaine was driven to apply the new guidance in order to give her patients better and safer care.

Actioning her objective, throughout 2016-to-2018, Elaine visited all 23 Borders GP practices either once or twice in order to deliver a respiratory update session to GPs and practice nurses. The update included an insight into when to prescribe, what to prescribe, the importance of non-pharmacological management, a look at the ‘new’ inhaler chart, and a hands-on session with the actual inhalers. Following the update either Elaine or the GPs / practice nurses would spend time – often many weeks – reviewing all patients prescribed high-dose ICS.

Community Pharmacist of the Year (Independent)

Sponsored by Cambrian Alliance Group

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Dalneigh Pharmacy, NHS Highland

James Higgins Dalneigh Pharmacy, NHS Highland

James Higgins
Dalneigh Pharmacy, NHS Highland

Working in a very demographically diverse area, James and the team have been steadfast in their determination to meet the challenge and ensure that the pharmacy is flexible enough to meet the wide range of needs which they’re presented with.

Inverness itself adds to this mix in that historically people are not geographically bound and may be registered with any practice in the city regardless of where they are domiciled. The pharmacy have thus sought to lessen the potential for error and frustration this creates by making themselves as accessible as possible to each practice and getting to know their preferred methods of communication, prescription request, triage and the services which they may or may not offer. This has produced excellent interprofessional links which have greatly enhanced the team’s growth, as well as improved the patient journey.

The pharmacy were also directly involved with two local practices in the pilot for the expansion of the Chronic Medication Service (CMS) through a ‘Test of Change’ which resulted in very high rates of CMS registration and of serial prescribing.

Parkhead Health Centre Pharmacy, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Alison Hair Parkhead Health Centre Pharmacy, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Alison Hair
Parkhead Health Centre Pharmacy, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Each day Alison and the team do their best to deliver the most effective health outcomes possible for all of the patients who present.

Notably, the four IP clinics within the pharmacy have contributed to the setting being recognised as a reliable source of assistance for the local population. The polypharmacy clinic is an opportunity to optimise medicines use by stopping unnecessary or ineffective medication, initiating medication where indicated, and making dosage adjustments to manage the patients’ long-term or acute conditions optimally. This involves a collaborative approach, with the patient at the centre of all decisions, supporting them to make informed choices about their care. Alison works closely with the GP and nurse colleagues in delivering this care, only referring to secondary care where necessary.

Working in collaboration with the clinicians and other affiliated healthcare workers, the pharmacy also runs a clinic for homeless patients who are registered with their homeless GP practice. Its establishment aligns with Alison’s aim to minimise the negative health impact of homelessness by helping patients access healthcare, and to support attendance at other relevant services.

Within the pharmacy setting the team are further participating in a project to increase public awareness of alcohol consumption by way of co-operating with staff from the Glasgow Council on Alcohol to facilitate alcohol brief interventions.

Bannerman’s Pharmacy, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Mark Feeney Bannerman's Pharmacy, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Mark Feeney
Bannerman’s Pharmacy, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Supporting their patients to live healthy lives is an important incentive for the team’s pharmacy services, particularly because they practice in an area of Glasgow with numerous social and health challenges, and encounter numerous individuals suffering from addiction problems coupled with other areas of ill health.

Channeling their expertise into strands of support, Mark and the team have worked with NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde to provide opiate replacement therapy and alcohol dependence services for their patients. This year the team have been involved in delivering holistic services, such as dry blood spot testing for hepatitis C and community pharmacist initiation of antiviral therapies through a PGD.

Always seeking to integrate innovation into the pharmacy, this year they invested in a new consultation room to improve the clinical setting of the pharmacy and help provide confidential advice and support to patients. Bar code scanning technology is also being phased in to implement an accuracy check when dispensing medicines; which thus frees up the pharmacists to spend more time with patients.

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